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Computational Fluid Dynamics and Australia’s next generation of supercomputers

26 November 2020
10:00am - 11:30am
Event cost: Free

The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre is launching its new bi-monthly “Supercomputing Series”.   In this series you will hear from expert researchers, as they discuss possibilities of the new capabilities at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre.

Please join us for our first webinar of the series and hear from Professor Richard Sandberg, at the University of Melbourne; and Dr. Christopher Leonardi from the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at the University of Queensland. Their interests are in high-fidelity simulation of turbulent flows and the associated noise generation in industrially relevant applications, mostly related to power generation and transport; and the development of large-scale numerical models.

Please register in advance for this meeting, at Zoom registration

About the event

  • Panellists include:
    • Richard Sandberg, University of Melbourne
    • Christopher Leonardi, Advance Queensland Fellow School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at the University of Queensland
    • Ugo Varetto, Pawsey CTO
    • Maciej Cytowski, Pawsey Head of Scientific Services
    • Alexis Espinosa Gayosso, Pawsey Supercomputing Applications Specialist

What topics will be covered during this webinar

  • Computational fluid dynamics and researchers work
  • Current limitations and the potential of supercomputers to overcome them
  • The next generation of Computational fluid dynamics research

Please register in advance for this meeting, at Zoom registration

About the Panelists

Professor Sandberg, University of Melbourne

Richard is Chair of Computational Mechanics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Melbourne. His main interest is in high-fidelity simulation of turbulent flows and the associated noise generation in industrially relevant applications, mostly related to power generation and transport. His objectives are to gain new physical understanding of flow and noise mechanisms and to use the data to help assess and improve low-order models that can be employed in an industrial context. For the latter he is pursuing novel machine-learning approaches that are based on evolutionary concepts.

He received his PhD in 2004 in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Arizona and prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he was a Professor of Fluid Dynamics and Aeroacoustics in the Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics research group at the University of Southampton and headed the UK Turbulence Consortium (www.turbulence.ac.uk), coordinating the work packages for compressible flows and flow visualisations and databases. He was awarded a veski innovation fellowship in July 2015 entitled: “Impacting Industry by enabling a step-change in simulation fidelity for flow and noise problems” and has been granted an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship for 2020-2023.

Dr. Leonardi, University of Queensland

Dr Christopher Leonardi - Centre for Natural Gas - University of QueenslandDr. Christopher Leonardi is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at the University of Queensland and an Advance Queensland Industry Research Fellow (Mid-Career). He holds a B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering with Class I Honours from James Cook University, a Ph.D. in Civil and Computational Engineering from Swansea University, UK, and a Research Affiliate appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.

Dr. Leonardi’s research is currently targeted at the development of large-scale numerical models which can be used to provide insight into the complex characteristics of fluid-solid interaction in oil and gas reservoirs. Much of this work is undertaken in close collaboration with industry via the UQ Centre for Natural Gas. Particular fields of expertise include the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flows, the discrete element method (DEM) for discontinuous systems, and the finite element method (FEM) for solid mechanics problems.

In addition to his academic pursuits, Christopher has over five years’ consulting experience, applying both computational and analytical techniques to solve problems in the mining and mechanical engineering disciplines. In that time he applied innovative FEM-DEM technology to industry problems in the areas of bulk materials handling, geomechanics, and structural mechanics.

Please register in advance for this meeting, at Zoom registration

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting from Zoom.

If you have any issues with registering or do not receive the Zoom details upon registration, please email us at help@pawsey.org.au

The event will take place at

  • 10:00 am AWST
  • 12:00 pm AEST
  • 1:00 pm AEDT